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Episode 019: Feminine Wellness, Equity & Social Responsibility with Beatrice Dixon

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Beatrice Dixon is the founder and CEO of The Honeypot Company: an innovative, natural, plant-based feminine care system that’s changing the intimate wellness game for all people with vaginas (and a treasured Days for Girls partner!). The idea for The Honeypot came to Beatrice in a visionary dream – first as a means of solving her own vaginal health problem, before blossoming into a revolutionary product line for women and vagina-owners across the country.

In this episode, Beatrice shares the unique origin story of The Honeypot; the company’s current offerings and social responsibility partnerships; and why she’s so passionate about leveraging her business to make a meaningful global impact. She also talks about the highs and lows of starting her own business from scratch – and leaves us with inspiring words about the tremendous value in struggle and resilience.

Notable Quotes:

“I just believe that it’s important as humans, as the human race, that we find a way to come together more and be kind to each other. Lift our vibration on how we think. Figure out how to have our society be an equitable one. I mean, will that ever happen? I don’t know. I just think that it’s important, because we’re all just trying to survive….I want to do whatever we can, I want to put any kind of dent into the system possible, for humanity, because I am a part of it, you know?”

“Whether your challenge is being Black, having a vagina, being Latin, trying to raise money or whatever, or just being a person of color or a minority because you’re a woman, or whatever the thing is…it makes you better. And that’s what matters. When you go through stuff, especially when it’s really hard, it just makes you sharper, it makes your thin skin thicker. It makes your eyes be open, it makes you pay attention. It makes you be aware. And if you really do it with a lot of kindness and humility and gratefulness, it just gives you this peace, that everything’s gonna be alright.”

Highlights:

  • The Honeypot founder’s story: how a dream helped Bea solve her ongoing struggle with bacterial vaginosis, before sharing her solution with the world.
  • Everything that The Honeypot offers for humans with vaginas: from herbal menstrual pads to vulva moisturizers.
  • Why having a vaginal skincare routine is just as important as caring for your hair, face and teeth.
  • The Honeypot’s corporate social responsibility program and ongoing partnerships.
  • Beatrice’s passion for creating a more equitable world, and why investing in global social justice issues (especially those that uplift women and girls) is important to her.
  • The greatest challenges and rewards she has experienced on her journey into business ownership.
  • How struggle, hardship and resilience fuels personal growth like nothing else can – and ultimately makes you stronger.

Connect:

Website: thehoneypot.co

Instagram: @thehoneypotco | @iambeadixon

Facebook: @thehoneypotco

Twitter: @thehoneypotco

Bio:

Beatrice Dixon had been suffering with bacterial vaginosis for eight months, when one night an ancestor appeared to her in a dream and provided her with a list of ingredients to heal herself. The concoction worked, and Dixon realized that she had something special to share. From that visionary dream, the formula for a powerful and effective herb-powered vaginal wash was created in 2014.

Dixon launched The Honeypot Company, a plant-derived vaginal wellness line created with the goal of providing humans with vaginas healthy alternatives to traditional feminine care products that are free of unwanted chemicals, carcinogens and sulfates. The rest is history. The Honeypot Company system spans the ongoing needs of the vagina from birth through menopause – producing an unparalleled complete care system.

An empowering black female entrepreneur, Beatrice has been featured on the Today Show, CNN and The New York Times; she was also named as one of Forbes’ Top 100 Female Founders and one of Ink Magazine’s Top 100 Women Entrepreneurs of 2020. Through her diverse background and experiences, Beatrice Dixon continues to make a mark in the world of natural health and retail with a truly revolutionary approach to human health and sexual wellness.

Transcript:

Jessica Wiliams 0:00
Welcome to the Days for Girls Podcast, a show about breaking barriers for women and girls around the world. I’m your host, Jessica Wiliams, chief communications officer at Days for Girls International. At Days for Girls, we believe in a world where periods are never a problem. We are on a mission to shatter the stigma and limitations associated with menstruation by increasing access to sustainable period products, and menstrual health education for all people with periods.

Today’s guest is Beatrice Dixon. Beatrice had been suffering with bacterial vaginosis for eight months, when one night an ancestor appeared to her in a dream and provided her with a list of ingredients to heal herself. The concoction worked and Dixon realized that she had something special to share. From that visionary dream, the formula for a powerful and effective herb-powered vaginal wash was created in 2014. Dixon launch The Honeypot Company, a plant-derived vaginal wellness line created with a goal of providing humans with vaginas healthy alternatives to traditional feminine care products that are free of unwanted chemicals, carcinogens and sulfates. The rest is history. The Honeypot Company system spans the ongoing needs of the vagina from birth through menopause, producing an unparalleled complete care system. Today, The Honeypot products can be found online and in stores nationwide at Target, Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Amazon, Bed Bath and Beyond and more. An empowering black female entrepreneur, she has been featured on the Today Show, CNN, The New York Times, and she was named as one of Forbes Top 100 Female Founders and one of Ink Magazine’s Top 100 Women Entrepreneurs of 2020. Through her diverse background and experiences, Beatrice Dixon continues to make a mark in the world of natural health and retail with a truly revolutionary approach to human health and sexual wellness.

I really, really loved this conversation today. Just a head’s up: today’s episode does have some adult language. So be careful with those tiny human ears and any sensitive ears that might be in the room. Alright, now let’s go on to the show. Beatrice, it is so good to have you here today on the Days fpr Girls Podcast. Thank you for coming on the show.

Beatrice Dixon 3:14
Thank you for having me.

Jessica Wiliams 3:15
Yeah, absolutely. Well, you are such a rockstar. And I am so excited about this conversation. The first thing that I want to dive into is about your vision for The Honeypot. If you don’t mind, I would love for you to tell me more about that.

Beatrice Dixon 3:33
Yeah, I mean, so I had been I have been dealing with a bacterial vaginosis infection for almost a year. Literally nothing that I did worked on it. But one morning, my grandmother came to me in a dream. And she basically was just sitting down at a tabletop and she handed me a piece of paper. And it had a list of ingredients on it. And she told me that this was how I was going to solve my problem. And, you know, and I had never really met her before, because she transitioned way before I was born, before I was even thought about being born. You know, my mother was a child. And so, um, you know, so it was… it was an interesting experience, but she quickly let me know that that wasn’t why she was here. You know, like she had come to meet me, to tell me what to do. Right, to tell me how to fix it. And so she just had me, in the dream, just keep repeating the ingredients over and over and over again, to the point where when I woke up, I was literally like – I woke up out of my dream, saying, you know, saying the ingredients and so I wrote it down. Um, I worked at Whole Foods at the time. So you know, so I went to work and I bought the stuff within the next couple of days, and then I made it, and then I started using it right away. And then everything that I was dealing with went away. It was crazy. Within like four to five days after using what I had made, what my grandmother had told me. And that’s how I got started. That’s how we got started with the company.

Jessica Wiliams 5:19
Wow, were you were you surprised by that? Or did you have visions like this often? Or was that your first time?

Beatrice Dixon 5:28
It was my first and last time that anything has been as crystal clear as that. Um, but I have had, I’ve had ancestors come visit me many times in my dreams. You know, sometimes I can, you know, when you have that – I don’t know if it’s if it’s ever happened to you where you’re laying in the bed, and you can’t move? I have a thing like that, you know, that when I was younger, that used to happen to me a lot. Um, but I’m here, I’m present, you know, so, I’m always open to whatever needs to come, right. Because in one way or another, you know, we’re in constant communication anyway, just with the things that mean – the way these things shake out, you know, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s our ancestors or anything. But, um, you know, but life is gonna happen. And in this case, my grandmother coming to visit me was life happening.

Jessica Wiliams 6:41
I mean, I just think that that is so fascinating. So you go out, you get the ingredients, you’re working at Whole Foods. Had you ever started a company before? Did you decide? Like, what, tell me what happens next?

Beatrice Dixon 6:54
Yeah, I had started a company before, but it was nothing like this. I had a cleaning business before. And I had to basically grow that up naturally. But what I realized is that, in a cleaning business, or any kind of a service based business, especially that type, you weren’t really making money, unless you were cleaning somebody’s house or somebody’s business, you know what I mean? And so it just didn’t, it just didn’t feel.. it didn’t feel, um, it just didn’t feel like that was what I wanted to do with myself, you know. I felt like I had wanted… when I made the decision to stop doing that full time, like, I just completely stopped. Because for a while, I kind of moonlighted with cleaning and working a job. And I was an artist, model, and I just did all kinds of stuff. Because I had to make money, I had to survive, right? And so, yeah, once I decided that I couldn’t do it anymore. I said to myself, whatever I do, whatever kind of business I ever start again, I have to make money in my sleep. Like, that was my, that was how I generally thought about it. And then I had an interest in skincare because I worked at Whole Foods and Whole Body. Right. And I don’t know how it is now but then, um, you know, it was it wasn’t a small business, it was still a big business, but it was ran like a small business. Right. And they would have reps coming in talking about how they make their products. And, you know, and they would send us on health immersions and they would send us to farms to learn about herbs and all this stuff. So I was really interested in potentially starting my own skincare company, so it wasn’t far away from where my mind was already going. You know what I mean? Yeah, you know, and then my coochie started acting up and then here we are.

Jessica Wiliams 9:03
[Laughter] Well, so I mean, you know, taking that lead from like, okay, I had a vision, I got the ingredients – to building a company like The Honeypot is, I mean, that’s a pretty big gap in there. And I’m curious, were you just in the beginning making your products in your kitchen? Or did you raise capital or how did it work? How did that go?

Beatrice Dixon 9:31
We just were just making it in the kitchen, and I gave it away for like a year and a half, you know, and my brother – who’s my co-founder – he, you know, he literally made sure I was fine, you know, gave me the money to pay for ingredients and things like that. And then I’m sorry, but I didn’t want to just put it out on the market. I had to make sure that it worked right, like that, and we didn’t have money to do any clinical trials or anything. Right? So that was like our form of a trial, having people try it. And then once I saw that, like, pretty much everybody that tried it loved it. Pretty much every person that had what I was dealing with, had a similar reaction, right? Like they had a similar, um, not reaction in a negative way. But they had a similar positive reaction, right. And they were saying they were experiencing the same things that I did when it was just going away. You know, some girls were calling me telling me like, I can just use water to wash myself now. And like, I don’t even have to… you know what I mean? It was things like that, and those things just kept happening. And then we went to the Bronner Brothers hair show, we took 600 bottles to that and we sold out in that weekend, which I thought was really cool. And, um, you know, and then that’s what told us that we really had something. And I just made it in the house that we had an office space, made it there. Um, you know, did that for a couple years. And then we got the opportunity to go into Target. And that, you know, that took about, I don’t know, six months or something like that, or a year – six months to a year, because that’s just how it works with retailers. You meet with them now. It’s not going to happen til next year this time. Right. But I didn’t know that then. You know, um, and yeah, I mean, it just continues to flourish, day by day. That’s amazing.

Jessica Wiliams 11:41
I love that story. What a great founder story. So for those people who aren’t familiar with The Honeypot, tell them about the types of products you provide.

Beatrice Dixon 11:49
So the types of products that we provide are extremely beautiful, efficacious feminine hygiene products. So we make external vulva washes, we make feminine wipes, that would also be for the vulva, or the bum, depending on what you’re using it for. We make boric acid suppositories, we make a really beautiful vulva cream that you can use for moisture. It’s not like a lubricant or anything, it’s more of like a moisturizer for your vulva. Because that place needs moisture too, sometimes, you know. Um, we make herbal menstrual pads, we make we make non-herbal menstrual pads, we do. We just launched an incontinence line. You know, we just launched a heavy flow line. So we make a lot of really, we try to cater to humans with vaginas, to the humans with vaginas that use our products based on their circumstances. So, you know, I always like to say that everybody may not be able to use all of our products, but we absolutely make a product for every human with a vagina.

Jessica Wiliams 13:01
I love it. That’s great. Um, you know, I shared – you guys sent me some products, which I was so grateful for, because we were, you know, looking at a partnership, which we’re we’re going to talk more about that. But, you know, I don’t have any specific issues, but one of my girlfriends does. And I gave her one of your products. And she came back to me and said, where did you get that? That’s the only thing that has solved my problem. And so do you hear that kind of thing all the time?

Beatrice Dixon 13:31
Yeah, I’m grateful to say that we do you know. And the cool thing, Jessica, is that you don’t have to have issues to use our products, right? Like you want to look at, you want to look at for example, you want to look at our external vulva washes in the same light that you would look at your beautiful wash that you use on your face, right? You have a system for – I know I have a system for how I take care of my face, right? We have systems for how we take care of our teeth. We have systems for how we take care of our hair, we shampoo it, we condition it. You know, as as a black woman, I moisturize it and you may do the same thing, right? And there’s different products that you use, you wouldn’t use toothpaste on your hair, right? So it’s the same. If you want to look at it in the same light, is that we literally – we are focused on you, on on your beauty routine as it relates to your vagina. Right? These are basically beauty products for your vagina and really for your vulva mostly, because the vagina is inside the body. Mm hmm.

Jessica Wiliams 14:47
I love it. Well, I’m glad to know that now the next time I get products from you. I’m gonna go to your website and be like, alright, I gotta get my whole routine going for my vagina.

Beatrice Dixon 15:00
We’re working on building out some really cool stuff.

Jessica Wiliams 15:06
I’m excited. Well, let’s talk about your corporate social responsibility program. Because I know social impact is really important to you. And I really want to dive into how you’re exploring that at The Honeypot.

Beatrice Dixon 15:20
Yeah, I mean, the way that we’re looking at our corporate social responsibility program… I’m going to start from my point of view. I’ve always wanted to do it, we’ve always been in a position kind of where we’ve had to kind of pick and choose the things that we do, because we run our business very lean, right? Because we have to, and we have always had to, you know, but we’re finally at a place where we can actually put some product and investment into some organizations that we believe in. Right? And, for me, personally, this is important to me. Because there’s like, real stuff happening. We have a partnership with Happy Period. Um, you know, mostly what happens with that is we support with product. Because with Happy Period, she focuses on providing products to homeless people who don’t have access to feminine care and let alone clean, feminine care, right? Yeah, and we’re working with girls for days, with investment dollars, we’re actually going to use proceeds because we have these really cute little keychains that say “we’re all pink inside.”

And we’re going to be working within with an organization called Alafiya. That basically, Alafiya does a lot of things, but one of the cool things that they do is they have a birthing program. Because in especially in West Africa, and Togo, and some other, you know, in a few other areas between Togo, Burkina Faso, like one out of 15 women dies from childbirth. Partially because they – mostly because they don’t have resources to have to take a prenatal vitamin, right? They may not have resources to even get to a clinic, right? There’s all kinds of cultural things that are there, right within their cultural system, where I mean, you know, some places have religious beliefs and don’t believe that they should go to the doctor, right? Um, and so what Alafiya does is, which is really dope is they go into these areas where, humans are really, I mean, these are like, extremely, extremely poor areas, where one clinic, one five room clinic, may be serving 10,000 people, right. And they, they make sure that, you know, they kind of identify women that really have a need, and they provide what’s kind of like an insurance program, to be able to provide their to be able to give them what they need, if there’s medicine that they need, there’s prenatals that they need this transportation that they need, if whatever it is that they need. Alafiya basically is there to help to sponsor that. And that’s just one of the programs that Alafiya does. And so that’s one that we’re investing in.

We’re also investing in the Georgie Badiel Foundation. Because Georgie Badiel, she actually grew up in Burkina Faso. And she was born there. And she would have to wake up every day, super early in the morning, to go and walk five to six hours to get water. Right. And to get the like, you’re walking five to six hours to get water. And not not only did you just have to do that walk through the desert, right? But you also had to do that walk and when you finally get to the water, you have to wait for the animals to finish. There could be animals, there anything can be there, right? And you’re drinking for your food, for your cleaning, your bod,y for everything. This water may or may not even be clean. Right? This water could have a lot going on with it. But this is the water that you have to have to survive. And so what Georgie Bodiel does is she basically builds water wells, in Burkina Faso. And so that’s one that we’re super excited about. Because the other thing behind that when you think about it, is typically the women that are walking for the amount of time that they’re walking, what if these women are on their period? Right? What if these women had an infection or something, right? Anything could be going wrong. And they still have to, they still have to do that walk, you understand.

And, um, anyway, I’m excited about these partnerships, these global partnerships, because they’re not just partnerships in the States, but I’m extremely excited about them. Because these are things that I’m really passionate about, you know, I’m very passionate about homelessness, I’m very passionate about about young girls, especially young girls in our country that don’t have access, you know, to just being able to take care of themselves. I’m very passionate about people having access to water, I’m very passionate about women who are pregnant, being able to have access just to be able to take their damn prenatal vitamins, you know? Um, so yeah, like, this has been, this has been kind of a long time coming. But I’m excited about it. And I’m grateful that we’re here.

Jessica Wiliams 21:19
Yeah, it’s amazing. I mean, I don’t see why every company doesn’t do what you’re doing, you know, apply some of their profits to some sort of socially responsible mission that they care about. It’s just a no brainer to me. I’m so glad you’re doing it. Me too.

Beatrice Dixon 21:35
But you know, what, Jessica, you know what happens is a lot of people don’t realize that. I mean, don’t make me wrong, even the investment that we’re making at Days for Girls right? Like, that’s a lot of money. Right. But if we only had $2,000, to invest in girls for days, girls for days would appreciate that, you understand what I’m saying? So I think a lot of times, companies don’t realize that whatever they can pull together, what would be appreciated from a nonprofit organization, right. And sometimes it doesn’t even necessarily have to be actual cash. Sometimes it could be resources, sometimes it can be product, it can kind of run the gamut, based on the organization, but I think a lot of times people just do not realize that they don’t have to give as much as they think they do. Which can which can make it seem a little prohibitive. Um, you know, because when you think about this, you’re thinking in a big scale, you know?

Jessica Wiliams 22:49
Yeah, that’s great advice. So, you know, as you were thinking about the social impact of The Honeypot… I’m curious, you know, I’ve heard you talk about equity, and how that is important to you and the brand. And so I was curious if you could talk a little bit about that.

Beatrice Dixon 23:16
Look, I I think that equity is absolutely important, right? Diversity is absolutely important. The thing that I’m extremely passionate about, is dispelling the myth of what the system of – whether that be basically in the construction of race, right, the construction of sex, meaning girl, boy, black, white, gay, straight. I think that we would do better as a society, if we could all understand that we are all the same, that we are all connected, that people who are less fortunate should be helped by people who are more fortunate. Right? That doesn’t mean that anybody’s giving a handout, that just means that if somebody doesn’t have the resources, if somebody has never seen anything more than what’s on their block, right. And that doesn’t mean just the black little black girl or black child, black boy, that could mean a Caucasian person, that can mean a Latin person, that can meet any person. Because this happens every day. I just believe that it’s important as humans, as the human race, that we find a way to come together more and and be kind to each other. Lift our vibration on how we think. Figure out how to how to just have our society be an equitable one. I mean, will that ever happen? I don’t know. I just think that it’s important, because we’re all just trying to survive. Right? What whether you got a million dollars in your bank account, or whether you got $1 in the bank account, right? Everybody needs food. Everybody needs water. Everybody needs shelter. Everybody needs clothes. Right? Every woman that has a vagina – that was born a woman with a vagina – needs period products, right? Like, these are things that you really can’t live without, you know, and so I just believe I’m a firm believer that there’s enough food on this planet that nobody should be hungry. Right? Our Earth is… what is it? 70% water? Like, why should anybody not have access to water? Right? Cotton is one of the largest textiles on the planet, how is it that everybody doesn’t have access to a pad? You know? And so, yes, you know, especially with the with Days for Girls, I’m just excited about all of this, and I’m excited to just…look, we don’t have enough money to be able to do this for everybody, because we just don’t. But I want to do whatever we can, I want to put any kind of dent into the system possible, for humanity, because I am a part of it, you know?

Jessica Wiliams 26:35
So, Beatrice, you are a… do you identify as BIPOC? Is that correct?

Unknown Speaker 26:43
Girl, I identify as a fucking human being. And I don’t need anybody to…don’t get me wrong. I love the color of my skin. I love my hair. I love my culture. But I also love the color of your skin. Right? And I also love all cultures, because that’s what makes us who we are. You understand what I’m saying? So I don’t need to fit in a box of BIPOC human like, miss me with that. I’m a human. And that’s enough.

Jessica Wiliams 27:21
Yeah, that’s why I asked. So, um, let’s talk about your experience as a human. Well, because I know from personal experience, starting a business is not easy. And, you know, no matter how you identify, that’s a hard thing to do. And I’m curious, you know, what is the biggest challenge that you’ve had to overcome in founding The Honeypot?

Beatrice Dixon 27:44
This is always a hard question for me. Because all you’re ever met with is challenges. You know, I mean, seriously, there is not a day that goes by that I’m not met with a challenge as it relates to our business. Honestly, not one, not one day goes by that I don’t have to make a massive decision. And so the thing that I will say, which I think it’s very important for humans that want to start a business, just like you said, it’s hard, no matter how you spin it, it’s hard to raise money. It’s hard to take something out of your brain that wasn’t there before. And turn that something into a physical thing. It’s hard, it’s hard to do that. It may be less hard for a person, you know, that went to Stanford or something, right? But that person has lived a different life. They have different relationships. They, for some reason, they were meant to do the shit that they’re doing. And so, sure, there’s been challenges. It’s hard to pull something out of thin air. It’s hard. Like I said, to raise money. It’s hard to manage a team. It’s hard to to make… it’s hard. You want to know the real, the hardest thing at this point? The hardest thing is the decision fatigue that comes with all the decisions that you have to make. Honestly, my brain hurts. You know, honestly, like, I’m not even trying to be funny, then. At this point, that’s actually one of the harder things for me. Yeah. Right. Like, I don’t want to think about what I’m going to eat, and how I’m going to get my house clean. Right? It’s like, the simple things are the things that I don’t want to decide right now. Because I have to, my brain has to be on – my brain has never had to be as much on as it is now. And that’s not something that people talk about. Right, you know, and if I’m honest, that’s the hardest part. Real shit. It’s hard. Right? When like you get with your family and they want to talk about what you’re doing. You’re like, Oh, I don’t want to talk about work, man. I don’t want to talk about the podcast that I did. Right? I don’t want to talk about that. Like, I just want to be here with you right now. You know, but at the same time, you have to be patient. And you have to be understanding, because they’re only wanting to talk about it, because they’re proud of you. Right?

Jessica Wiliams 30:44
Yeah, I mean, you know, it’s true. I do, I’ve been there. And I think you’re right, it is hard to pick out that one thing, and, you know, it’s just doing what you’re doing. It’s hard, like you said. You created something out from scratch, and you’re trying to make something of it in the world. And you’re not in an easy space, let’s face it, like, you know, if you’re going to start a business, doing it in like, you know, in a way that empowers women, and then, you know, deals with their vaginas is like…[Laughter] Girl, it’s like your grandmother showed up and was like, I’ve got something real hard for you to do. I’m gonna really push you, really expand your mind.

Beatrice Dixon 31:34
But you know what, Jessica, you know what’s dope about it, is you become so intelligent. You sharpen, especially if you really got your head in it, and you really work hard to like, not be egotistical, and be humble and be grateful. What happens is your emotional intelligence just gets so sharp, you know, your decision making, even though it’s exhausting, your decision making gets so sharp, you know. I’m, like, something massive can be put – as a matter of fact, something massive can be put on my table. Right? And I can see it. And I might be stressed out on it for a couple of days. But I’ll have it figured out, right, with not just with me, but with the team, we will have that thing figured out within days or weeks, right? Where in the beginning, when you don’t know what you don’t know. And you’re not able to hire people that know what you don’t know. Right, you have to just continue to just figure it out on your own. But it makes you better, it makes your mind really sharp. And it gives you this intelligence that can’t be bought, or can’t be taught, you know. Cuz that’s the stuff that, that particular thing is the part of it that that makes me love this shit so much.

Because it’s all the things that it’s taught me, that that you just couldn’t have learned in school. It’s like getting a PhD in the school of hard knock. It is tough. But I but I quite enjoyed it, because I’m grateful that my mind can be this sharp. You know, I’m grateful that I can see something and be like, I would do A, B, C, D, E, F, G, in a matter of minutes. I can stat that out. Right? I can come up with a business idea at this point in my life, and if I had an idea come into my head, I can map out something really dope, a really dope concept. Quick. That’s what those challenges, that original question that you asked me, that’s what that does to you. Right? So whether your challenge is being Black, having a vagina, being Latin, trying to raise money or whatever, or just being a person of color or a minority because you’re a woman, or whatever the thing is, right? It makes you better. And that’s what matters. That’s what you keep your eye on, that’s the prize that you keep the eye on, is that when you go through stuff, especially when it’s really hard, it just makes you sharper, it makes your thin skin thicker. You know, it makes your eyes be open, it makes you pay attention. It makes you be aware. And if you really do it with a lot of kindness and humility gratefulness. It just gives you this peace, that you know, everything’s gonna be alright. Because you know, all the shit that you had to do to get to where you are. So literally nothing can stop you. You know?

Jessica Wiliams 35:16
I’m just getting chills, you’re so inspirational. Thank you, you should go around and do inspirational talks. Do you do that?

Beatrice Dixon 35:26
I do a little bit, um, I do a little bit, but you know, that can be a lot though, too. Because you have to give so much energy in order to do that. And people want that and I want to give it, I want to give that, so I’m working on a book. I’m gonna, I mean, I’m not fully working on it yet. But the the seed is planted in my mind. So I hope to do that with, um, I hope to do that with writing materials. Um, you know, because when I’m at some point, you know, all the stars align when I’m not having to work 70 hours a week, right? Um, I really want to spend that time enjoying this planet. I don’t – I’m not in a rush. To just work, work, work, work work. I don’y, don’t I’m not a robot. You know?

Jessica Wiliams 36:32
Yeah. I hear ya. I hear ya. Well, this has just been a fantastic conversation and I could just I could talk to you for forever, I think, and hopefully we’ll get to meet some day in person soon. For those people who want to connect with you personally and learn more about The Honeypot, where can they go?

Beatrice Dixon 36:51
They can go to thehoneypot.co or .com. They can go to Instagram – the brand is @thehoneypotco. You can pretty much find this on every social media handle between Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Tik Tok. My personal IG is @iambeadixon, I think that’s what it is – let me look real quick. It’s hilarious because I’m not the biggest Instagrammer. But it’s I-AM-B-E-A-D-I-X-O-N. And if you want to figure out where our products are, what I would recommend is that you go to our website, the honeypotco, go to the store locator, put in your zip code, and it’ll tell you everywhere close by.

Jessica Wiliams 37:39
Sweet, I love it. And I definitely recommend that people check it out – the products are great. And like we said earlier , The Honeypot is a partner of ours and a supporter of Days for Girls. So we really appreciate you and your partnership and the work you’re doing in the world. Thank you so much for coming on the show. It’s just been a pleasure.

Beatrice Dixon 37:58
Thank you! And I miss – I always always flip it, I said girls for days, I apologize. I meant Days for Girls.

Jessica Wiliams 38:08
Oh, no worries. We knew what you were talking about! You weren’t the first person that’s done that.

Beatrice Dixon 38:14
You know what your mama used to say that? Did you grow up with sisters and brothers? Oh, yeah. She’d be calling everybody else name. You get in trouble because you didn’t answer! She’d be like, you knew what the hell I was saying, you knew I was talking to you! [Laughter] So yeah, thank you. So you know what I’m talking about.

Jessica Wiliams 38:32
Oh, I do. Yeah. My fellow southerner. My accent’s – if we stay much longer my accent will start coming out!

Beatrice Dixon 38:42
I love it! Well, thank you so much for your partnership. And thank you for having me on your podcast. I’m grateful for it.

Jessica Wiliams 38:50
Absolutely!

The Days for Girls Podcast is produced by Days for Girls Pod International. For show notes and resources mentioned in this episode, visit daysforgirls.org/podcast. If you’d like to support the work we do on the show, leave a rating or a review wherever you listen, subscribe to the show, and share our episodes on social media or with your friends. To learn more about Days for Girls, and to join our global movement, please daysforgirls.org. Thank you for listening. See you next time.

 

Jessica Williams
Jessica Williams is Chief Communications Officer of Days for Girls International. She is also the host of The Days for Girls Podcast. Jessica holds a Bachelor’s degree from Wake Forest University in Communications and a Master’s degree in Strategic Communications from The University of Oregon. She is also an adjunct instructor for the University of Portland’s Pamplin School of Business Nonprofit MBA program.